CUSP9v3, a combination of 9 repurposed drugs for the treatment of glioblastoma.

Info

Location: University Clinic Ulm, Germany
Collaboration: Prof. Dr. M.E. Halatsch & Dr. R.E. Kast

 

Glioblastoma is the most frequent type of brain tumors. In most European and North American countries there are 3-4 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year, mostly in adults. In most cases, glioblastoma cannot be completely removed by surgery. After surgery, the tumor will therefore be treated with temozolomide (a chemotherapy) and radiotherapy. Despite this additional treatment, many patients do not survive more than a year.

If the tumor comes back after the patient has been treated with temozolomide and radiotherapy, there are no real treatment options left.

For decades, researchers have been looking for new experimental therapies for these patients. Unfortunately they have repeatedly failed to improve their outcome. In 2013 two investigators suggested that a reason for these failures could be that glioblastoma can always find a way to escape the action of one single therapy. They have proposed a treatment that will act on several mechanisms used by glioblastoma to grow. This treatment consists of 9 different drugs that are currently marketed for other indications than cancer, to be given together with temozolomide (the current standard chemotherapy for treatment of glioblastoma.)
In this clinical trial, the experimental treatment will be given to 10 patients (February, 2017) to assess if the treatment is safe and tolerable. The trial is currently open for participants (German citizens only).

More details about this study (NCT02770378) at www.clinicaltrials.gov.

Professional info

Location: University Clinic Ulm, Germany
Collaboration: Prof. Dr. M.E. Halatsh & Dr. R.E. Kast

 

For decades, new experimental therapies have repeatedly failed to improve the outcome of patients relapsing after initial treatment of glioblastoma. In 2013 two investigators suggested that a reason for these failures could be that glioblastoma could always find a way to escape the action of single therapy. They have proposed a strategy to act on several mechanisms used by glioblastoma to grow, using drugs that are currently marketed for other indications than cancer. After a thorough search of existing scientific data, taking into account low likelihood of adding to patient side effect burden, good quality of life (QOL) maintenance, and adequate clinical experience with the drug in question as additional selection criteria, they have identified and selected 9 drugs to be given together with temozolomide, the current standard chemotherapy for treatment of glioblastoma.

The 9 all-oral, ‘repurposed’ drugs that were selected to be administered simultaneously together with low-dose, uninterrupted daily temozolomide are: auranofin, itraconazole, celecoxib, ritonavir, sertraline, captopril, aprepitant, disulfiram and minocycline. The participants will receive the experimental treatment in 28-day treatment cycles after an induction cycle of 35 days, in which the drugs will be up-dosed to their target doses.

In this clinical trial, the combined treatment will be administered to 10 patients (February, 2017) to assess the safety and tolerability of this experimental treatment. The trial is currently open for enrollment (German citizens only).

More details about this study (NCT02770378) at www.clinicaltrials.gov.